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W3C

SVG Integration Draft Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/WG/"&gt;SVG Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-svg-integration-20140417/"&gt;SVG Integration&lt;/a&gt;. This specification details requirements on how SVG documents must be processed when used in various contexts, such as CSS background images, HTML "iframe' elements, and so on. These requirements include which features are restricted or disabled, such as scripting and animation. A number of referencing modes are defined, which other specifications that allow the embedding or referencing of SVG documents can normatively reference. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Graphics/"&gt;Graphics Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

XQuery 3.0, XPath 3.0, XQueryX 3.0, XDM 3.0, Serialization 3.0, Functions and Operators 3.0 are now W3C Recommendations

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/XML/Query/"&gt;XML Query Working Group&lt;/a&gt; published &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xquery-30-20140408/"&gt;XQuery 3.0: An XML Query Language&lt;/a&gt;, along with &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xqueryx-30-20140408/"&gt;XQueryX&lt;/a&gt;, an XML representation for XQuery, both as W3C Recommendations, as well as the &lt;a href="/TR/2014/NOTE-xquery-30-use-cases-20140408/"&gt;XQuery 3.0 Use Cases&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href="/TR/2014/NOTE-xquery-30-requirements-20140408/"&gt;Requirements&lt;/a&gt; as final Working Group Notes. XQuery extends the XPath language to provide efficient search and manipulation of information represented as trees from a variety of sources.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/XML/Query/"&gt;XML Query Working Group&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/XSL/"&gt;XSLT Working Group&lt;/a&gt; also jointly published W3C Recommendations of &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xpath-30-20140408/"&gt;XML Path Language (XPath) 3.0&lt;/a&gt;, a widely-used language for searching and pointing into tree-based structures, together with &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xpath-datamodel-30-20140408/"&gt;XQuery and XPath Data Model 3.0&lt;/a&gt; which defines those structures, &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xpath-functions-30-20140408/"&gt;XPath and XQuery Functions and Operators 3.0&lt;/a&gt; which provides facilities for use in XPath, XQuery, XSLT and a number of other languages, and finally the &lt;a href="/TR/2014/REC-xslt-xquery-serialization-30-20140408/"&gt;XSLT and XQuery Serialization 3.0&lt;/a&gt; specification giving a way to turn values and XDM instances into text, HTML or XML. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Read about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/XML/"&gt;XML Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

XML Entity Definitions for Characters (2nd Edition), and Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 3.0 2nd Edition are W3C Recommendations

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Math/"&gt;Math Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published two W3C Recommendations today:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-xml-entity-names-20140410/"&gt;XML Entity Definitions for Characters (2nd Edition)&lt;/a&gt;. This document defines several sets of names, so that to each name is assigned a Unicode character or sequence of characters. Each of these sets is expressed as a file of XML entity declarations.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-MathML3-20140410/"&gt;Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 3.0 2nd Edition&lt;/a&gt;. This specification defines the Mathematical Markup Language, or MathML. MathML is a markup language for describing mathematical notation and capturing both its structure and content. The goal of MathML is to enable mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for text.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Math/Activity"&gt;Math Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

W3C Track at WWW2014 in Seoul

&lt;p&gt;&lt;a class="imageLink" href="http://www2014.kr/"&gt;&lt;img src="http://www.w3.org/2014/04/logoWWW2014.png" alt="WWW2014 logo" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt;At this year&#8217;s 23rd International World Wide Web Conference (&lt;a href="http://www2014.kr/"&gt;WWW2014&lt;/a&gt;), W3C organizes &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2014/04/w3c-track.html"&gt;W3C tutorial and W3C tracks&lt;/a&gt; where conference participants are invited to learn from, meet and discuss with our team of experts. With the conference located in Korea, the W3C track sessions also cater specifically for the Korean industry. The presentations and discussions are about Web Cryptography, Web Publishing, Web &amp; TV, and Web accessibility. W3C and Tim Berners-Lee will dedicate the last W3C track session to the &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/"&gt;Web 25th birthday&lt;/a&gt;; ideas for the Web came and are still coming from the WWW conference series, thus we will give the floor to the audience and ask conference participants how they see the Web evolving in the next 25 years. So, come and discuss!&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

MBUI: Abstract User Interface Models, and Task Models Notes Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2011/mbui/"&gt;Model-Based User Interfaces Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published two Group Notes today:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-abstract-ui-20140408/"&gt;MBUI &#8211; Abstract User Interface Models&lt;/a&gt;. Model-Based User Interface Design facilitates interchange of designs through a layered approach that separates out different levels of abstraction in user interface design. This document covers the specification of Abstract User Interface Models, by defining its semantics through a meta-model, and an interchange syntax (expressed as XML Schema) for exchanging Abstract User Interface Models between different user interface development environments.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-task-models-20140408/"&gt;MBUI &#8211; Task Models&lt;/a&gt;. Task models are useful when designing and developing interactive systems. They describe the logical activities that have to be carried out in order to reach the user's goals. This document covers the specification of Task Models, with a meta-model expressed in UML, and an XML Schema that can be used as the basis for interchange of Task Models between different user interface development tools.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2007/uwa/"&gt;Ubiquitous Web Applications Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

CSS Line Grid Module Level 1, and CSS Scoping Module Level 1 Drafts Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/members"&gt;Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published two Working Drafts today:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-css-line-grid-1-20140403/"&gt;CSS Line Grid Module Level 1&lt;/a&gt;. This module contains CSS features for aligning content to a baseline grid.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-css-scoping-1-20140403/"&gt;CSS Scoping Module Level 1&lt;/a&gt;. This specification defines various scoping/encapsulation mechanisms for CSS, including scoped styles and the @scope rule, Shadow DOM selectors, and page/region-based styling.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/"&gt;Style Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Review of apps that use network information Note Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Mobile/IG/"&gt;Web and Mobile Interest Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Group Note of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-netinfo-usecases-20140403/"&gt;Review of apps that use network information&lt;/a&gt;. The web platform currently lacks a means of exposing network-related information to web applications. Network information includes, but is not limited to, the type of network connection currently in use by a device (e.g., cellular, Wi-Fi, etc.). It can also include information such as the system notifying the application when the type of connection changes from one type to another (e.g., from cellular to Wi-Fi). Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Mobile/"&gt;Mobile Web Initiative Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Vocabularies for EmotionML Note Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2002/mmi/"&gt;Multimodal Interaction Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Group Note of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-emotion-voc-20140401/"&gt;Vocabularies for EmotionML&lt;/a&gt;. This document provides a list of emotion vocabularies that can be used with EmotionML to represent emotions and related states. EmotionML provides mechanisms to represent emotions in terms of scientifically valid descriptors: categories, dimensions, appraisals, and action tendencies. Given the lack of agreement in the community, EmotionML does not provide a single vocabulary of emotion terms, but gives users a choice to select the most suitable emotion vocabulary in their annotations. In order to promote interoperability, publicly defined vocabularies should be used where possible and reasonable from the point of view of the target application. The present document provides a number of emotion vocabularies that can be used for this purpose. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2002/mmi/"&gt;Multimodal Interaction Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

CSV on the Web Use Cases and Requirements, and Model for Tabular Data and Metadata Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2013/csvw/"&gt;CSV on the Web Working Group&lt;/a&gt; published two First Public Working Drafts today:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-csvw-ucr-20140327/"&gt;CSV on the Web: Use Cases and Requirements&lt;/a&gt; collects use cases that are at the basis of the work of the Working Group. A large percentage of the data published on the Web is tabular data, commonly published as comma separated values (CSV) files. The Working Group aim to specify technologies that provide greater interoperability for data dependent applications on the Web when working with tabular datasets comprising single or multiple files using CSV, or similar, format. This document lists a first set of use cases compiled by the Working Group that are considered representative of how tabular data is commonly used within data dependent applications. The use cases observe existing common practice undertaken when working with tabular data, often illustrating shortcomings or limitations of existing formats or technologies. This document also provides a first set of requirements derived from these use cases that have been used to guide the specification design.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-tabular-data-model-20140327/"&gt;Model for Tabular Data and Metadata on the Web&lt;/a&gt; outlines a basic data model, or infoset, for tabular data and metadata about that tabular data. The document contains first drafts for various methods of locating metadata: one of the output the Working Group is chartered for is to produce a metadata vocabulary and standard method(s) to find such metadata. It also contains some non-normative information about a best practice syntax for tabular data, for mapping into that data model, to contribute to the standardisation of CSV syntax by IETF (as a possible update of &lt;a href="http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc4180.txt"&gt;RFC4180&lt;/a&gt;).&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;Learn more about the &lt;a href="https://www.w3.org/2013/data/"&gt;Data Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Last Call: CSS Flexible Box Layout Module Level 1

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/members"&gt;Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Last Call Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-css-flexbox-1-20140325/"&gt;CSS Flexible Box Layout Module Level 1&lt;/a&gt;. The specification describes a CSS box model optimized for user interface design. In the flex layout model, the children of a flex container can be laid out in any direction, and can &#8220;flex&#8221; their sizes, either growing to fill unused space or shrinking to avoid overflowing the parent. Both horizontal and vertical alignment of the children can be easily manipulated. Nesting of these boxes (horizontal inside vertical, or vertical inside horizontal) can be used to build layouts in two dimensions. CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Comments are welcome through &lt;strong&gt;22 April 2014&lt;/strong&gt;. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/"&gt;Style Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Navigation Timing 2 Draft Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2010/webperf/"&gt;Web Performance Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-navigation-timing-2-20140325/"&gt;Navigation Timing 2&lt;/a&gt;. This specification defines a unified interface to store and retrieve high resolution performance metric data related to the navigation of a document. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The Group also updated the Candidate Recommendation of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/CR-resource-timing-20140325/"&gt;Resource Timing&lt;/a&gt;, which defines an interface for web applications to access the complete timing information for resources in a document. The main change is that &lt;code&gt;onresourcetimingbufferfull&lt;/code&gt; is now an event handler instead of a callback function. A &lt;a href="diff.html"&gt;diff document&lt;/a&gt; is available.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2006/rwc/"&gt;Rich Web Client Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Last Call: Web Cryptography API

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2012/webcrypto/"&gt;Web Cryptography Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Last Call Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-WebCryptoAPI-20140325/"&gt;Web Cryptography API&lt;/a&gt;. This JavaScript API performs basic cryptographic operations in web applications, such as hashing, signature generation and verification, and encryption and decryption. Additionally, it describes how applications can generate and/or manage the keying material necessary to perform these operations. Comments are welcome through &lt;strong&gt;20 May 2014&lt;/strong&gt;. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Security/"&gt;Security Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

CSS Lists and Counters Module Level 3 Draft Published, CSS Namespaces Module Level 3 Recommendation Updated

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/members"&gt;Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-css-lists-3-20140320/"&gt;CSS Lists and Counters Module Level 3&lt;/a&gt;. This draft contains the features of CSS level 3 relating to list styling. It includes and extends the functionality of CSS level 2 [CSS21]. The main extensions compared to level 2 are a pseudo-element representing the list marker, and a method for authors to define their own list-styles.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The group also updated in place the 29 September 2011 Recommendation of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-css-namespaces-3-20140320/"&gt;CSS Namespaces Module Level 3&lt;/a&gt;. The changes include the addition of three grammar rules which aren&#8217;t used in the spec itself, to avoid having to add them to new specs that do need them; addition of an extra explanation to an example (&#8220;because&#8230;&#8221;); change to the term &#8220;rule sets&#8221; to &#8220;style rules.&#8221; Both are correct, but the latter is easier to understand.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/"&gt;Style Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

W3C Invites Implementations of CSS Writing Modes Level 3, CSS Shapes Module Level 1

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/members"&gt;Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Working Group&lt;/a&gt; invites implementation of two Candidate Recommendations:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/CR-css-writing-modes-3-20140320/"&gt;CSS Writing Modes Level 3&lt;/a&gt;. CSS Writing Modes Level 3 defines CSS support for various international writing modes, such as left-to-right (e.g. Latin or Indic), right-to-left (e.g. Hebrew or Arabic), bidirectional (e.g. mixed Latin and Arabic) and vertical (e.g. Asian scripts).&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/CR-css-shapes-1-20140320/"&gt;CSS Shapes Module Level 1&lt;/a&gt;. CSS Shapes describe geometric shapes for use in CSS. For Level 1, CSS Shapes can be applied to floats. A circle shape on a float will cause inline content to wrap around the circle shape instead of the float's bounding box.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Style/"&gt;Style Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.0 is a W3C Recommendation

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/PF/"&gt;Protocols and Formats Working Group (PFWG)&lt;/a&gt; today published &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-wai-aria-20140320/"&gt;Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.0&lt;/a&gt; and the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-wai-aria-implementation-20140320/"&gt;WAI-ARIA 1.0 User Agent Implementation Guide&lt;/a&gt; as W3C Recommendations. WAI-ARIA is a technical specification for making dynamic, interactive Web content accessible to people with disabilities. WAI-ARIA and supporting documents are described in the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/aria"&gt;WAI-ARIA Overview&lt;/a&gt;. See more information in &lt;a href="https://www.w3.org/2014/03/aria.html.en"&gt;W3C&#8217;s Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) 1.0 Expands Accessibility of the Open Web Platform press release&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/blog/2014/03/wai-aria-expands-web-accessibility"&gt;WAI-ARIA Expands Web Accessibility blog post&lt;/a&gt;. Read about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/"&gt;Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Last Call: User Interface Security Directives for Content Security Policy

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2011/webappsec/"&gt;Web Application Security Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Last Call Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-UISecurity-20140318/"&gt;User Interface Security Directives for Content Security Policy&lt;/a&gt;. This document defines directives for the Content Security Policy mechanism to declare a set of input protections for a web resource&#8217;s user interface, defines a non-normative set of heuristics for Web user agents to implement these input protections, and a reporting mechanism for when they are triggered. Comments are welcome through &lt;strong&gt;18 June&lt;/strong&gt;. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Security/"&gt;Security Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

First Public Working Draft of Subresource Integrity Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2011/webappsec/"&gt;Web Application Security Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a First Public Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-SRI-20140318/"&gt;Subresource Integrity&lt;/a&gt;. This specification defines a mechanism by which user agents may verify that a fetched resource has been delivered without unexpected manipulation. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Security/"&gt;Security Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

W3C Workshop on the Web of Things

&lt;p&gt;W3C announced today a &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2014/02/wot/"&gt;Workshop on the Web of Things&lt;/a&gt;, 25-26 June 2014, in Berlin (Germany). The event is hosted by Siemens.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The Web of Things is expected to have broad and sweeping economic and societal impact. Open standards will be critical to enabling exponential growth of the kind we experienced with the early days of the Web.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;This workshop will examine the potential for open standards as a basis for services, either between devices, at the network edge, e.g. in home hubs, or in the cloud. It will discuss the use of web protocols and scripting languages for implementing services, the need for APIs for implementing drivers for specific IoT technologies, a shared approach to describing services as a basis for interoperability, and the underlying use of HTTP/COAP, Web Sockets, and EXI/JSON for RESTful services.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt; W3C membership is not required to participate. The event is open to all. All participants are required to submit an expression of interest or a longer position paper by &lt;strong&gt;25 April 2014&lt;/strong&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Metadata API for Media Resources 1.0 is a W3C Recommendation

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2008/WebVideo/Annotations/"&gt;Media Annotations Working Group&lt;/a&gt; published a Recommendation of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-mediaont-api-1.0-20140313/"&gt;Metadata API for Media Resources 1.0&lt;/a&gt;. This document defines an API to access metadata information related to media resources on the Web. The overall purpose is to provide developers with a convenient access to metadata information stored in different metadata formats. The API provides means to access the set of metadata properties defined in the Ontology for Media Resources 1.0 specification. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2008/WebVideo/"&gt;Video on the Web Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

W3C Invites Implementations of State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Voice/"&gt;Voice Browser Working Group&lt;/a&gt; invites implementation of the Candidate Recommendation of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/CR-scxml-20140313/"&gt;State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction&lt;/a&gt;. This document describes SCXML, or the &#8220;State Chart extensible Markup Language&#8221;. SCXML provides a generic state-machine based execution environment based on CCXML and Harel State Tables. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/Voice/"&gt;Voice Browser Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Clipboard API and events Draft Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2008/webapps/"&gt;Web Applications Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Working Draft of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-clipboard-apis-20140313/"&gt;Clipboard API and events&lt;/a&gt;. This document describes APIs for clipboard operations such as copy, cut and paste in web applications. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2006/rwc/"&gt;Rich Web Client Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Linked Data Platform Use Cases and Requirements Note Published

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2012/ldp/"&gt;Linked Data Platform (LDP) Working Group&lt;/a&gt; has published a Group Note of &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-ldp-ucr-20140313/"&gt;Linked Data Platform Use Cases and Requirements&lt;/a&gt;. To foster the development of the Linked Data Platform specification, this document includes a set of user stories, use cases, scenarios and requirements that motivate a simple read-write Linked Data architecture, based on HTTP access to web resources that describe their state using RDF. The aim throughout has been to avoid details of protocol (specifically the HTTP protocol), and use of any specific vocabulary that might be introduced by the LDP specification. Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/2013/data/"&gt;Data Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

First Public Working Drafts of Annotation Use Cases, Requirements for Latin Text Layout and Pagination

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/dpub/IG/"&gt;Digital Publishing Interest Group&lt;/a&gt; has published two First Public Working Drafts today:&lt;/p&gt; &lt;ul class="show_items"&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-dpub-annotation-uc-20140313/"&gt;Annotation Use Cases&lt;/a&gt;, which describes the set of use cases generated for Annotation and Social Reading within the W3C Digital Publishing Interest Group, in coordination with the Open Annotation Community Group.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-dpub-latinreq-20140313/"&gt;Requirements for Latin Text Layout and Pagination&lt;/a&gt;, which describes requirements for pagination and layout of books in latin languages, based on the tradition of print book design and composition. It is hoped that these principles can inform the pagination of digital content as well, and serve as a reference for the CSS Working Group and other interested parties. This work was inspired by JLREQ.&lt;/li&gt; &lt;/ul&gt; &lt;p&gt;Learn more about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/dpub/"&gt;Digital Publishing Activity&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Happy Birthday World Wide Web!

&lt;p&gt;&lt;a class="imageLink" href="http://www.webat25.org/"&gt;&lt;img src="/2014/03/web25-250.png" alt="Web 25th anniversary" /&gt;&lt;/a&gt; Today, around the world, people are joining Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee in wishing the World Wide Web a happy 25th birthday. To mark the occasion, everyone is encouraged to share birthday greetings on social media using #web25. &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/greetings"&gt;Select greetings&lt;/a&gt; will also be posted on a virtual birthday card on the official anniversary site &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/"&gt;webat25.org&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;&#8220;The Web&#8217;s billions of users are what have made it great,&#8221; said Berners-Lee. &#8220;I hope that many of them will join me today in celebrating this important milestone. I also hope this anniversary will spark a global conversation about our need to defend principles that have made the Web successful, and to unlock the Web&#8217;s untapped potential. I believe we can build a Web that truly is for everyone: one that is accessible to all, from any device, and one that empowers all of us to achieve our dignity, rights and potential as humans.&#8221;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Read the &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/news/press-release-the-world-celebrates-25-years-of-the-web"&gt;full press release&lt;/a&gt;, &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/news/tbl-web25-welcome"&gt;welcome message and video from Tim Berners-Lee&lt;/a&gt;, and &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/greetings"&gt;special greetings to the Web&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Please visit &lt;a href="http://www.webat25.org/"&gt;the Web&#8217;s 25th anniversary site&lt;/a&gt; regularly for more details on activities and events all year long, including &lt;a href="/20/"&gt;W3C&#8217;s 20th Anniversary Symposium&lt;/a&gt; which will take place in Santa Clara, California, and will be live-streamed.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Ian Jacobs at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Updated Techniques for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 and Understanding WCAG 2.0

&lt;p&gt;The &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/"&gt;Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group&lt;/a&gt; today published updates of two Notes that accompany WCAG 2.0: &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-WCAG20-TECHS-20140304/"&gt;Techniques for WCAG 2.0&lt;/a&gt; and &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/NOTE-UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20-20140304/"&gt;Understanding WCAG 2.0&lt;/a&gt;. (This is not an update to WCAG 2.0, which is a stable document.) For information on these updates and links to blog posts, please see the &lt;a href="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ig/2014JanMar/0165.html"&gt;WCAG Techniques &amp; Understanding WCAG Updated March 2014 e-mail&lt;/a&gt;. Read about the &lt;a href="http://www.w3.org/WAI/"&gt;Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)&lt;/a&gt;.&lt;/p&gt; </content>

by Coralie Mercier at April 18, 2014 10:00 AM

Microsoft - IEBlog

What's new in F12 with Windows 8.1 Update

We are excited to announce a set of substantial updates to the developer tools in IE, (F12) as well as in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2. The updates in F12 accompany the new releases in IE11.

Previously, we described the capabilities of F12, and its focus on a fast, iterative workflow, on providing accurate data in the DOM Explorer and on providing actionable data in the memory and performance tools.

As you use F12 with this update, you will notice enhancements for the following:

  • A tighter, iterative workflow with change tracking in the CSS tools
  • An ability to debug in the code you wrote such as CoffeeScript or TypeScript, with sourcemaps support, and debug "just-my-code," if you are using libraries from other developers
  • Enhancements that get you to solutions faster, for example when finding memory leaks, with the enhanced JS snapshot tools and filtering improvements.

Let's take a look at these improvements to the F12 tools.

Tracking Changes you make in CSS with Change-bars

One of the great strengths of tools like F12 is they allow you to edit the look of any Web site directly within the browser, without you requiring our source code. However, if you spend time making edits it is difficult to keep track of all the changes you make across your CSS and then applying those final edits back to you origin sources. To improve this situation we have introduced an ability to record and track changes, both visually with "change-bars', as well as through a new "Changes' CSS panel in the in the DOM Explorer.

Any change you make in the Styles pane in the DOM Explorer to CSS rules and properties will have a visual clue in the left-margin next to the property or rule that you edited. These are the "change-bars', and they show green for new properties, yellow for changed properties and values and red for deleted properties. These change-bars will be retained, even if you begin to look at other DOM nodes.

Changebars on the styles tab

Changebars on the Styles tab

As you may make multiple edits across many nodes, we added a new tab in the CSS panel that lists all the changes in the current F12 session, as a "diff' view so that you can use it as a checklist when you make manual edits to your source code. It also supports the ability to copy and revert changes through a context menu.

The new changes tab

The new Changes tab

Debugging your App with "Just My Code"

If you are developing Web sites and apps, then you are likely using 3rd party libraries like jQuery or Angular, and typically these libraries are often minified. We often see developers who are debugging their code step into library code, and get buried in the depths of that library, before being able to get back to their code to debug their issue.

Visual Studio has supported a feature called "Just My Code" (JMC) managed languages for a while and with Visual Studio 2012, it is also enabled for JavaScript. The idea behind JMC is that we keep the debugger in your code, in the code you want to debug and not into code you can't really change.

With this feature now in F12, there are two key things you will see when you debug

  • You will never "step into' a file (library) that is marked as library code. You can mark a library through the file picker in the debugger (see below), even if you have stepped into the file. Once marked, any step operation will take you to your code.
  • If you enable "break on all exceptions" you will never break on an exception thrown and handled in library code.

Marking files as library code

Marking files as library code

By default F12 will recognize files that match the URL *.min.js as library code. You can modify this behavior easily however, by marking libraries in the debugger's file picker or in the context menu of the file tab if you have the file open in the debugger.

We will show much more about this feature and the workflow in a follow-on blog post.

Debugging your App written with other Languages using Source Maps (v3)

As JavaScript apps have become more and more complex recently there's an increasing trend to author in another language that compiles to JavaScript (the F12 tools are written in TypeScript and compiled to JavaScript for example). Similarly, you may have minified JavaScript code that is not the origin source that you wrote the app in. This compilation process means the JavaScript that executes in the browser and that you debug, isn't the code you have in your editor, which makes debugging more challenging.

To solve this problem, there's a community-driven format that has gained a lot of traction with browsers and Visual Studio, that maps origin source and compiled files called "Source Maps" (spec). These maps are generated during compilation and with this release of F12 we've added support for v3 of the Source Map spec.

When a compiled JavaScript file defines a valid source map, F12 will default to load the original source file, rather than the running JS file, when "source maps' are turned on (a button on the debugger). You will have the following capabilities:

  • Files in the file picker use their origin source name, rather than the running documents.
  • The file(s) you open in the debugger, and use to step through your code are your origin source files, and for TypeScript, CoffeeScript and Script # these files will be colorized appropriately (as you can see with the TypeScript file below).

The file(s) you open in the debugger, and use to step through your code are your origin source files, and for TypeScript, CoffeeScript and Script # these files will be colorized appropriately

As with Just-My-Code, we will go into more depth on source maps in a follow-on blog post.

Three way snapshots

When debugging a memory leak, you typically will be presented with a large amount of data, even if filtered) that memory profilers create, which makes finding that leak complicated. In F12 we had previously taken steps for the tools to summarize the state of the app in the snapshot tiles, and opportunistically suggest potential issues with the detached DOM information indicators. However, in this update, we wanted to take this further, by helping developers zero-down on issues even easier.

The F12 Memory tool now includes the ability to compare three snapshots (and get a scoping view of those snapshots), that is a cleaner process to determine a leak. The snapshots are:

  • The initial state of your app before you start the scenario that provides the baseline for objects in your app.
  • Once your scenario is completed, which may augment the possible baseline for your app, which then requires a further snapshot once you execute the scenario again.
  • The "back to normal' state of your application, once you try the scenario again. In this state all of the objects from your scenario should have been freed (or you expect them to be alive).

With these snapshots you can compare them and use the new "Scope" filter dropdown to select the "objects left over from snapshot #2," which represents your scenario end state and potentially a set of objects that shouldn't be around anymore, as shown below.

Scope filter

Scope filter

The types view that you see above, shows the list of objects and a gutter indicator of where potential issues may reside.

Tooling for IE on Windows Phone in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2

If you have spent time trying to make a compelling mobile version of your Web site you have likely hit issues with it not looking or working correctly on mobile browsers.  To help with this on Windows Phone, we're excited to announce that in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 we have enabled the use of Visual Studio's debugging and performance tools for Internet Explorer on Windows Phone 8.1. For more details on this have a read of the Visual Studio ALM Blog on this topic.

Many other improvements"

In this release of F12 we've tried to address many customer requests, as well as address bugs that include several crashes caused by the network inspector and not respecting conditional comments when using F12 to emulator lower document modes. Rather than the list the bugs here the bugs will be updated on the Microsoft Connect site for IE (https://connect.microsoft.com/IE/Feedback).

Here's a more detailed list of the changes you'll see in this release of F12.

Shell

  • Ctrl+[ and ctrl+] to navigate between tools

Console

  • Dropdown to enumerate execution targets.
  • Inspect objects that are logged via console.log including printf-style formatting.
  • Locals (at breakpoint) in intellisense for the console.
  • Console $_ shortcut to access the result of the last evaluation in the console.
  • Always record console messages " before F12 launch (via Internet Options -> Advanced -> (check) Always record developer console messages).

Debugger

  • Persist BPs, Watches, Tabs and the like so I don't keep losing my state.
  • Debug my Typescript/compiled code inside F12 using Source Maps.
  • Debug just my code and not be bothered by library code (JMC).
  • Name eval code via //#sourceUrl=<url> comment.
  • Keyboard shortcut to abort and refresh page when broken via ctrl+shift+f5.
  • Fully qualified function names (e.g. a.b.c) in call stack and profiler views.

DOM Explorer

  • CSS pseudo states - set the pseudo state for an element to test out my pseudo styles.
  • CSS Changebars - see what values have changed in the styles view.
  • CSS Changes View - see final applied CSS changes and copy to clipboard.
  • Combined Computed Style Panel - view the CSS styles in a cohesive and CSS pane adding editing and links to source.
  • Ctrl+b in DOM Explorer for select element.

Emulation

  • Doc Mode Awareness - why my page is in certain doc mode in order to understand my compatibility scenarios better.

UI Responsiveness

  • Sort all levels of events in the timeline details view by duration.
  • Simplify the timeline details view by filtering out events within certain categories (e.g. GC, Image decoding).
  • Easily zoom the graph and detail views to the duration of time for a specific event instance (via context menu).
  • Identify the exact property that was changed (and the value it was changed to) when a DOM element's inline styles are programmatically modified.

Memory

  • Identify the line of code that was responsible for allocating a specific function, so that I can correlate memory with source.
  • Context menu item to show object in dominators view (and view retained size etc.).
  • Updates to the types views to show which type(s) accounted for the majority growth in a diff, so that you can rationalize object churn more easily.
  • Gridlines on table UI.
  • Settings UI (show built ins, circular refs, object ids).

Summary

With this update to IE11 and F12, we're updating developer tools more often getting you the latest features and bug fixes as soon as we can. Expect to see and hear from us more and if you'd like to provide feedback, or ask for new features and help simply reach out on twitter @IEDevChat, or through the IE11 Send Feedback tool or on Connect.

This post just scratches the surface of what's new in F12. Over the next few weeks we'll be publishing blog entries that go into more depth and show you how to use F12. There's also our complete F12 developer tools documentation on MSDN.

In the meantime, we look forward to your feedback. You can reach out to the team on Twitter @IEDevChat, through the IE11 Send Feedback tool or on Connect.

" Andy Sterland, Program Manager, F12 Tools

" Jonathan Carter, Program Manager, F12 Tools

" Simon Calvert, Lead Program Manager, F12 Tools

by ieblog at April 14, 2014 09:59 PM

Microsoft - IEBlog

April 2014 Internet Explorer Updates

Microsoft Security Bulletin MS14-018 - Critical

This security update resolves six privately reported vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. The most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted Web page using Internet Explorer. An attacker who successfully exploited the most severe of these vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the current user. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.

This security update is rated Critical for Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, Internet Explorer 8, Internet Explorer 9 and Internet Explorer 11 on Windows clients, Moderate for Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, Internet Explorer 8, Internet Explorer 9, and Internet Explorer 11 on Windows servers. Internet Explorer 10 is not affected. For more information, see the full bulletin.

Recommendation. Most customers have automatic updating enabled and will not need to take any action because this security update will be downloaded and installed automatically. Customers who have not enabled automatic updating need to check for updates and install this update manually. For information about specific configuration options in automatic updating, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 294871.

For administrators and enterprise installations, or end users who want to install this security update manually, Microsoft recommends that customers apply the update immediately using update management software, or by checking for updates using the Microsoft Update service.

Security Update for Flash Player (2942844)

On April 8th, a security update for Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer 10 and 11 on supported editions of Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 is also available. The details of the vulnerabilities are documented in Adobe security bulletin APSB14-09. This update addresses the vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash Player by updating the affected Adobe Flash binaries contained within Internet Explorer 10 and Internet Explorer 11. For more information, see the advisory

Most customers have automatic updating enabled and will not need to take any action because this update will be downloaded and installed automatically. Customers who have not enabled automatic updating need to check for updates and install this update manually. For information about specific configuration options in automatic updating, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 294871.

" Wilson Guo, Program Manager, Internet Explorer

by ieblog at April 08, 2014 10:05 PM

Eric Meyer

All the Way to the End, All of Us Together

Our first day here at Disney World, we tried to go on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, but it was closed "for refurbishment", so we decided to try Splash Mountain instead.  In addition to being a ride that was right there where we were, it promised to cool us off a bit.  Going from 30ºF to 90ºF in the space of a day was a bit rough on everyone.

Carolyn and Uncle Jim sat in the front seat of the log boat, and Rebecca sat between me and Kat in the next seat back.  Things started well enough as we splooshed and bobbed around bends, but fairly near the beginning of the ride, you get a glimpse of its (sort-of) end: a fifty-foot drop down to a splash pool.  Rebecca, seeing a log full of people fly past us down the ramp, the screams of its riders trailing in its wake, wasn't at all happy.  She switched instantly from being amused at the water occasionally splashing her parents to scared of what was going to happen.

The various animatronic displays along the way helped distract her, but she kept returning back to her fear of the big hill.  Kat and I soothed her as best we could, telling her it would be all right.  She generally accepted this, calming down until the next time she remembered the big hill that lay ahead.  She never cried, exactly, but the fear was still there, an almost physical thing at times.

"I don't wanna go down the big hill!"

"Honey, it's all right.  It's going to be okay.  We're right here.  Mommy and I will keep you safe."

"No, I don't wanna, it's too scary."

"I know, sweetie.  I know you don't.  But there's no need to be afraid.  It's coming and it will happen and then it will be over.  Try to enjoy all the little shows before."

"Daddy, please let me get off the ride."

"I can't, honey.  If there was a way to get off, we'd take it, but there isn't.  The ride goes where it goes, and we'll go with it, together."

"I wanna get off this ride!"

"I wish we could get off, Rebecca, but we're on the ride now and we have to take it all the way to the end.  I know you're scared, but we're right here with you.  We'll keep you safe, sweetie.  You don't have to be afraid."

We'd arrived at the bottom of the last climb, the one that would take us to the big drop.  She looked up the ascending tunnel into the bright, bright light streaming down, and shrank back, quivering, her eyes wide with fear.  She knew the moment was close.  I leaned in next to her, keeping my voice level and light.

"I know, Rebecca.  I know.  I know you're scared, but it's going to be all right.  It's going to be all right.  It'll be all done very soon.  Mommy's here, and I'm here, and we're with you until it's over.  We'll stay with you all the way to the end, all of us together.  We'll be right here with you.  Always."

The log was drawn up the hill, the drop coming closer and closer, relentlessly.  My arm around her shoulders, Kat's arm around her shoulders, both of us hunched toward her tiny, trembling body pressed against our sides; and as we came to the precipice, she shut her eyes and squeezed our hands tight.

by Eric Meyer at April 08, 2014 02:16 PM

QuirksMode

Suppressing the 300ms click delay

By default, if you tap on a touchscreen it takes about 300ms before a click event fires. It’s possible to remove this delay, but it’s complicated. I investigated it.

The reason for the delay is double-tap. Once your finger releases the screen, the OS and browser cannot be sure yet if you’re done with your touch action, or if a second tap will follow, which would make the action a double tap (which causes a zoom). The only way to be sure that the action is a single tap is waiting a little while, giving you the chance to make the second tap. Hence the delay.

This article gives a good overview of the problem and the solution. Unfortunately the browser compatibility information it offers is not quite right. See below.

This delay is annoying to web developers. That’s why browser vendors are looking for ways to remove it if at all possible. This is only possible if it’s unlikely that the user wants to double tap — in other words, if the user cannot zoom or is unlikely to zoom.

Now I HATE disabling zooming because it’s Evil. Not uninformed, or a bad idea. Evil. If users need to zoom on your page that’s YOUR fault for not making text and images big enough. So don’t add insult to injury.

That’s why I like the recent Chrome idea of also disabling double-tap when the page uses width=device-width. If the page is optimised for your device, it’s likely that you won’t have to zoom. And if you have to zoom anyway, pinch-zoom is still available. So this is a nice trade-off, and I’ll be watching the results of Google’s experiment with interest.

But anyway. How exactly can you suppress the 300ms click delay? Advanced web developers will immediately realise that that depends on the browser. I investigated it so you don’t have to. Findings:

  • Removing the delay is not possible in Safari. That’s because in Safari double-tap has the additional meaning of “scroll;” something no other browser does.
  • Chrome, Opera, and UC9 remove the delay when you use width=device-width. Contrary to reports I read, Firefox on Android does not. Also, there is a fairly serious Chrome catch. See below.
  • When you set user-scalable=no, Chrome, Opera, BlackBerry, and Firefox Android suppress the delay.
  • When you set initial-scale=1,minimum-scale=1,maximum-scale=1 the same browsers suppress the delay, and also UC9 and Dolphin.
  • IE10 allows you to remove the delay with (-ms-)touch-action: manipulation or another value that suppresses double-tap zooming.

That’s it, I’m afraid. Any browser not mentioned above gives no way of suppressing the delay.

Chrome weirdness

Unfortunately Chrome is acting weirdly when you set width=device-width. I test Chrome on the Galaxy S4 phone and the Nexus 7 tablet, and found that, while the delay is removed on the S4, it is not on the Nexus 7. When I tweeted this, Paul Kinlan replied that the Chrome on his Nexus 7 properly suppressed the delay. I don’t doubt that Paul saw what he reported, but it doesn’t concur with my tests.

As far as I know Opera 20 copies Chrome’s behaviour, but I did not test this extensively.

This morning I crowdsourced the tests, and found the following:

  1. Phones generally suppress the delay, although I received one S4 and one MotoX report where Chrome did not suppress it.
  2. The Nexus 7 gives mixed results; it sometimes suppresses the delay and sometimes does not. However, just before publishing this article I was notified that there are in fact two flavours of Nexus 7. It could be that the bug occurs on one but not the other. Unfortunately I don’t know which version mine is, or which version the people that replied to my test request have.
  3. I received one report of a Nexus 7 that did not suppress the delay on which Chrome crashed after doing the test 25 times. I have not been able to reproduce this.
  4. I received one report from a Galaxy Tab 2, and it did suppress the delay.

I give up. There’s clearly a bug somewhere with suppressing the delay on width=device-width, especially on Nexus 7, and I assume Google will eventually find it and fix it.

Update: Bug found and it's being fixed. That was fast.

April 07, 2014 12:12 PM

Eric Meyer

On Writing

Our situation, and my posts, have been the cause of sleepless nights and fallen tears for a great many people.  In some ways I feel bad about that; it occasionally feels like I'm forcing our pain onto other people, which isn't exactly a friendly thing to do.  But I know you're here because you want to be here for us, and here, words are how we commune.

But why, I am occasionally asked and occasionally ask myself, am I writing about Rebecca's cancer instead of doing other things?  There are a number of reasons.

Part of it is that I'm creating a precisely timestamped chronicle for later, the historian in me asserting itself.  This is where a lot of my tweets come from, as well: the desire to record something at the moment, so that later I'll be able to say whether X happened before or after Y or how many days apart two events actually were.

But it's also for Joshua, if he wants to know more about his sister and what happened to her, when he's older; and for Carolyn, if she ever wants to revisit this time or see it from my perspective, to compare against her memories.  And perhaps for others, if I ever decide to collect these fragments into some sort of longer work.

More importantly, writing about what's happening and how I feel about it allows me to organize my thoughts and give some structure to what's happening.  In a situation where so much is beyond our ability to do anything at all, this is something I can shape directly.  It allows me to feel some small measure of influence.  It lets me face my fears by naming them.  It helps me get a handle on a few shards of this overwhelming thing that defies any real understanding.

And of course I'm grieving online.  I do that here so that I can put it away elsewhere, so to speak.  When I'm with the kids, I can be there for them as the father I've always been and hope to keep being, rather than the hollowed-out ruin I sometimes feel like.  Grieving here, through the words that come to me, makes that easier to do.  So I write and tweet.  A little bit of pressure release.

But most of all, I am sharing Rebecca with you, with anyone who will listen.  We've always felt it's up to our kids to become themselves and then bring themselves to the world in their own way, to meaningfully affect it and be affected by it.  In the words of Khalil Gibran:

Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.

You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.

You are the bows from which your children
as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
and He bends you with His might
that His arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the archer’s hand be for gladness;
For even as He loves the arrow that flies,
so He loves also the bow that is stable.

We've always meant for our children to fly free of their own accord, on the arc of their choosing, when they were ready.  Rebecca will almost certainly not have that opportunity.

So now we are her archers.  In the Web, I have a bow that can send her arrow all the way around the world.  If her flight is to be short, then let it be far, a trail of purest fire etched across every sky, more beautiful and wondrous than any comet could ever hope to be.

by Eric Meyer at April 04, 2014 07:03 PM


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